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杂志Magazine美树本晴彦 角色设定画集亚洲插画家TASCHEN:与大咖一起玩艺术萌趣阅读童趣奇妙之旅Bibliotheca Universalis系列活动「拥有」艺术Magazine B经典必读当代文学类型小说影视原著全部商品文学不死Zaha Hadid 作品展5月母亲节书单台版盛宴,“读”享你我4·23 世界读书日踏春书单201603台湾主题大人的私旅大人的私旅产品那些屏幕上没有出现的文字甜蜜时光蒋勋趣味人文講堂傅科摆建筑巡礼一人、一物、一辈子茶的故事不期而会的惊喜PHAIDON:百年艺术沉淀炽热夏天,阅读「燃」起来!阅读·美好生活(旧)gestalten:创意生活,型格人生Rizzoli:印刻浮华光影Octopus:夏日乐活派对,居家图书提案东瀛图书展用一个“PIE”,填饱你爱美的胃!TASCHEN:艺术潮流,你PICK哪个?美学周长/艺术直径=PIE愿最美的文字跃进你的杯青幻舍Seigensha360°BOOK童心异想世界gestalten:自然之作 心的感受PHAIDON:穿越世纪的美学探索限量艺术善本十周年七夕送礼求生指南寺田克也中国巡回活动Rizzoli:重现黄金时代最酷的大小孩善本自版Thames & Hudson:纸上艺术馆你是哪一“PIE”?TASCHEN:打破艺术距离你好,生活家!Prestel:经典艺术史·从文艺复兴到后现代Yale University Press:追寻真理之光导演的洞见演员的剖析电影幕后制作特辑影视创造指南定格的时光Thames & Hudson:纸上艺术馆(1)史蒂文·麦柯里个人作品集世界美食Phaidon:跨越星辰 致敬经典Thames & Hudson:沉醉艺术世界Laurence King:创意领跑Hoxton Mini Press限量版-艺术限量版-摄影限量版-表演艺术限量版-设计限量版Rizzoli:穿梭时空的时尚之旅小老鼠波波DK宝贝触摸书苏斯博士 Dr. Seuss立体翻翻书你好,世界艺术大师启蒙小指南大人物小人物,大梦想皮特猫小饼干洞洞书滑动看抽拉书吉竹申介埃尔维·杜莱艾瑞·卡尔马里恩·杜查斯贝娅特丽丝乔恩·克拉森孤独星球奥利弗·杰弗斯乐高凯迪克奖马克马丁博洛尼亚童书奖纽伯瑞奖其他获奖绘本我的小小外文童书馆普利兹克建筑奖luster出版社Abrams:接受吧 艺术投喂折纸艺术翻翻书青幻舍:光与影之舞Little Gestaltengestalten: 岂止于书善本出版14周年时尚课外读物TASCHEN40周年taschenPIE探寻中东欧艺术略影人,诗意地栖居Octopus出版集团线上书展时尚永不眠创造可能性:安藤忠雄上海见面会点燃设计大爆炸·善本图书快闪店第一站华裔设计师刘扬巡回演讲【安藤忠雄——亚洲的未来】上海保利大剧院讲演活动回顾寺田克也中国巡回活动TASCHEN x 上海西岸艺术与设计博览会TASCHEN x 上海西岸艺术与设计博览会(1)
D005Vogue(USA) -共12期 2020年06期 6-7月刊
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D005Vogue(USA) -共12期 2020年06期 6-7月刊
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140.00
ISBN: 9770754964918
Publisher出版社: Vogue 杂志社
Language版别: 期刊Magazine
Category分类: 期刊杂志Magazine
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受疫情影响月刊改为6-7合刊,50多年来首次使用静物照做封面:Rose ‘Colour Wonder 来自摄影师Irving Penn。

Introducing our special June/July issue of Vogue, which features on its cover an unpublished (and breathtaking) photograph—Rose ‘Colour Wonder,’ 1970—by Irving Penn. “I don’t think I am alone in wishing for a little bit of hope right now,” Anna Wintour writes in her editor’s letter. “It’s a brave act to optimistically consider the future—but that’s the kind of bravery we need now more than ever.”






MAGAZINESPECIAL ISSUE

In This Together

BY ANNA WINTOUR


April 23, 2020


Irving Penn Rose, ‘Colour Wonder,’ London, 1970. © The Irving Penn Foundation.

20200520




AS I INTRODUCE THIS SPECIAL ISSUE OF VOGUE, which we’re launching here ahead of its release next month, I want to say that I hope you are all well and dealing with this deeply challenging moment as best you can. Like you, no doubt, I’ve been left reeling by the dramatic changes we’ve experienced in the space of a few short weeks and the constant emotional challenges of striving to look after our families, friends, colleagues—and ourselves. It’s not as if we haven’t gone through tough times in the past, but this one feels different: The crisis is global in scale, and none of us have been left untouched. We’ve all witnessed terrible scenes and felt acutely how the coronavirus has affected our lives, and we are incredibly grateful for those who have selflessly stepped forward to keep our communities safe. We owe a huge debt of gratitude to medical workers in particular—and we have paid tribute to them here in a series of images taken by the photographer Ethan James Green.




Tanzania Johnson nbsp Having to think on my feet has been the biggest challenge says Johnson a Navy hospital corpsman...

Tanzania Johnson   

“Having to think on my feet has been the biggest challenge,” says Johnson, a Navy hospital corpsman and respiratory-therapy technician from Maryland. “A lot of this is new—information changes every hour.”Photographed by Ethan James Green






Jennifer Ratcliff nbsp Ive never seen this many patients in one place says Ratcliff an Air Force colonel and orthopedic...

Jennifer Ratcliff   

“I’ve never seen this many patients in one place,” says Ratcliff, an Air Force colonel and orthopedic surgeon based in Florida. “This is almost like being deployed—people having to find different places to work and use different resources to get the job done.”Photographed by Ethan James Green






AS I INTRODUCE THIS SPECIAL ISSUE OF VOGUE, which we’re launching here ahead of its release next month, I want to say that I hope you are all well and dealing with this deeply challenging moment as best you can. Like you, no doubt, I’ve been left reeling by the dramatic changes we’ve experienced in the space of a few short weeks and the constant emotional challenges of striving to look after our families, friends, colleagues—and ourselves. It’s not as if we haven’t gone through tough times in the past, but this one feels different: The crisis is global in scale, and none of us have been left untouched. We’ve all witnessed terrible scenes and felt acutely how the coronavirus has affected our lives, and we are incredibly grateful for those who have selflessly stepped forward to keep our communities safe. We owe a huge debt of gratitude to medical workers in particular—and we have paid tribute to them here in a series of images taken by the photographer Ethan James Green.


Ethan photographed just a few of the many who have come to New York to help the hardest-hit city in America. These health-care professionals were photographed outside the temporary field hospital created at the Javits Center at the start of April to alleviate some of the pressures on local hospitals. Many of those whose pictures we took came from far away—Florida, California, and elsewhere—putting their own lives on hold and leaving families behind to do something for others. Their selflessness is a poignant reminder of how we are all in this together.



Cindy Dagsaan nbsp We came to make a difference in a short amount of time says Dagsaan a Navy reservist and nurse...

Cindy Dagsaan   

“We came to make a difference in a short amount of time,” says Dagsaan, a Navy reservist and nurse practitioner from California. “Our fellow health-care providers have been working tirelessly, and it’s an honor to be working to give them a reprieve.”Photographed by Ethan James Green

Patricia Riley nbsp I came because I dont have small children says Riley who works for the New York State Department of...



Patricia Riley   

“I came because I don’t have small children,” says Riley, who works for the New York State Department of Health in Albany. “I wanted to do my part so that people with children could stay home with them.”Photographed by Ethan James Green





It’s hard to believe that, as I write this, it has been just over a month since we returned from the fall 2020 collections in Europe, though the shadow of the coronavirus had already started to fall on us even then, as we watched in horror while the situation in Italy began to unfold. We barely had a week back in the office before making the move to working remotely, changing everything—including our June/July issue, which was created as the worlds of fashion, theater, movies, and art were on lockdown. For this special issue, we asked a number of our friends and collaborators—including designers, actors, artists, photographers, and models—to create self-rendered images that reflected the new realities of their lives. We present a wide-ranging portfolio of these images today, and will post more in the days to follow. I want to thank everyone who participated.


This isn’t, of course, the first time that Vogue has documented dark moments in our history: One thinks of Lee Miller’s indelible images of a devastated postwar Europe; of the fashion industry’s response to the heartbreaking AIDS crisis; and of how we played our part in helping and healing our country after 9/11. Yet with this June/July Vogue we are in unexplored territory—commissioning, designing, and producing everything remotely. Thanks to the hard work and dedication of the Vogue staff, I hope that we have created a document of this moment for the years to come: a poignant reminder of how we were all acutely missing the miracles of everyday life and the joy that they can bring.